102/104 Green Lesson Plan April

Our April theme is 'Wonderful Weather!'

Literacy/Language

Books: S Is For Sunshine by Carol Crane

            Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

            What Will The Weather Be? by Lynda DeWitt

            The Cloud Book by Tomie dePaola

Purpose: Expose children to oral language and books.     

 

   

Creative Expression:

Songs: “If All The Raindrops Were…”

            “The Green Grass Grows All Around”

            “You Are My Sunshine”

            “Rain, Rain, Go Away”

Dramatic Play: Trying on rain boots, hats, and sunglasses

Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.    

 

   

Science/Social Studies/Math:

   Activities: Watching the squash plants grow in our classroom

                    Exploring light and dark with our light table

                    Splashing with colored water in the sensory table

                    Squishing “rain cloud” wet cotton balls in a clear bag          

 Purpose: Experience with numeration; engage their senses of touch & listening.  

 

   

Physical Development:

 Activities:  Crawling through cardboard boxes

                    Walking or crawling in the grass outside on sunny days

                     Clapping our hands like thunder

                      Blowing windmills inside and watching them spin from the wind outside

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups.  

 

  

­    Arts Appreciation:

Activities:

            Painting paper plate umbrellas

            “Window Painting” with paper & paint inside a clear bag

            ‘Sunshine Stamps’ using paper towel rolls or paper cups

            Painting white clouds using sponges on blue paper

 Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.   

 

     

”    Parent Participation:

 

    Take your child for a walk outside! Explore the weather and nature with them by talking about what you see, hear, smell, or touch. Share with us through pictures or stories of your adventures outside!                                              

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

                                                       

102/104 Green Newsletter April

Room 102/104 Green Newsletter

      April 2016

   Announcements

 

This Month’s Theme: This month’s theme will be “Wonderful Weather!”. The children will look and listen to books about the weather and get to feel sunshine and watch clouds while spending time outside! We will explore different sounds like thunder claps and rain drops, and also get to observe squash plants growing inside the classroom. They will use sponges to paint white clouds on blue paper and explore the differences between light and dark with our light table.

Lesson Plan: Please see reverse side for this month’s curriculum.

 

Special Announcements: Monday, April 11th through Friday, April 15th, is the Week of the Young Child. We will have an Infant & Toddler Breakfast on Friday, April 15th to celebrate! This will take place from 7:30-9am and we will provide breakfast to enjoy in your child’s classroom.

 

Temporary Goodbye & Congratulations: As everyone knows by now, Erin is expecting a baby girl towards the end of this month! Although we will miss her while she is on her maternity leave, we couldn’t be more excited for our friend and wonderful new mom! Please help us all in congratulating her before she leaves!

Tidbit of the Month

Allergies in Babies

thebump.com

What is an allergy for a baby?

“An allergy is a sensitivity to something in the environment,” says Mark Moss, MD, pediatric allergist at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics. It’s essentially an overreaction of the immune system. For some reason, the immune system sees a harmless substance as harmful and goes into overdrive. When baby’s body is exposed to the allergen (the trigger substance), it produces an antibody called IgE. IgE then affects the organ systems, causing symptoms ranging from itchy, watery eyes and sneezing (if it’s an airborne allergen) to a belly ache (like with some food allergies).

What are the symptoms of allergies in babies?

Baby’s symptoms will depend on what organ systems are affected. Environmental, airborne allergies, such as mold and pollen allergies, typically affect the respiratory system, so baby might have a runny nose or difficulty breathing. Food allergies usually affect the gastrointestinal system, so baby could have lip swelling, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea if she’s allergic to a food. And some allergies affect the skin, so she could get a rash or hives after coming into contact with an allergen. In general, watch for any adverse reaction -- and if you see one, note which substance baby’s been exposed to. You’re looking for a pattern, not a onetime occurrence. Allergic reactions can increase in severity over time, so be sure to tell baby’s doctor if there are any noticeable changes. If your child ever develops shortness of breath or difficulty breathing after exposure to an allergen, seek medical help immediately.

Are there any tests for allergies in babies?

“To diagnose an allergy, we have to find the presence of IgE specific to the triggering allergen. That can be done with an allergy skin test, a blood test or an older type of allergy testing called an intradermal skin test,” Moss says. If you suspect your child has an allergy, consult her pediatrician. They’ll want you to describe her reaction to the offending substance (or substances) and also ask about her medical and family history. (A family history of allergies increases the risk of allergies, as does a past history of eczema.) If the initial pediatric evaluation suggests there could be an allergy, your child may be referred to a pediatric allergist for allergy testing. Skin-prick testing is the most common form of allergy testing in young kids; if your child develops hives when a small amount of allergic substance is “pricked” onto her skin, she’s probably allergic to that substance.

How did my baby get allergies?

Some children are more prone to allergies than others. Doctors have noted that babies who have eczema are more likely to develop food allergies and that kids with food allergies are more likely to develop environmental allergies and asthma. Family history plays a role as well. If you or your husband has allergies, your child is more likely to develop allergies. A lot of kids, though, develop allergies for no apparent reason.

What’s the best way to treat allergies in babies?

Avoidance. Avoiding your child’s trigger substances should be the cornerstone of her allergy management plan. So that may mean switching to a hypoallergenic laundry soap or keeping peanuts out of the house -- and instructing grandparents and child care providers to keep them away from your child too. Medications may help ease your child’s allergy symptoms. An antihistamine (such as Benadryl) can control the itching, hives and runny nose that accompany certain environmental allergies. Your child’s doctor may also order daily meds to control allergy symptoms. Immunotherapy, or “allergy shots” that essentially expose your child to small amounts of the allergen in an attempt to desensitize her, can also be helpful. A lot of kids outgrow their allergies, though, so be sure to weigh the risks and benefits of any proposed treatment with your child’s allergist. Children with severe, life-threatening allergies may need to keep an EpiPen, a syringe filled with a dose of epinephrine, with them at all times. If your child has a severe allergy, make sure that all caregivers thoroughly understand the symptoms of anaphylaxis and know how to use the EpiPen if it’s needed.

What can I do to prevent my baby from getting allergies?

It’s not clear whether you can. Doctors used to advise waiting until your child is older (over nine months or one year) to introduce common allergens, such as wheat or peanuts, but there’s no solid evidence that this approach works to prevent allergies. And now, some research actually seems to suggest that introducing small amounts of potentially allergenic food early on in a child’s life can prevent food allergies. Talk to your doctor to get the latest information on allergy prevention.

 

Have a wonderful month!

Lana, Erin, Katie & Madi

106-108 Green Lesson Play April 2016

106-108 April 2016

Monthly Curriculum Plan

Literacy/Language

  • Read: Baby Loves Spring by Karen Katz

  • Read: Spring is Here by Will Hillenbrand

  • Read: Countdown to Spring by Janet Sabalman

  • Read: My Spring Robin by Anne Rockwell

  • Read: The Spring Rabbit by Jorge Dunber

  • Read: The Start of Spring by Frederick Warm

  • Read: Wake Up, It’s Spring by Lisa Campbell Ernst

Purpose:  Expose children to oral language and books.

Creative Expression

  • Sing:  “If All the Raindrops”

  • Sing:  “The Ants Go Marching”

  • Sing:  “Rain, Rain, Go Away”

  • Fingerplay: “The Days of Spring”

  • Fingerplay: “Caterpillar”

  • Sing: “You are My Sunshine”

Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.

Science/Social Studies/ Math

  • Shine flashlights in a darkened room/visually track the light

  • Feel water and mud on our feet

  • Explore nature items from outside (some under contact paper)

  • Use our sense of smell to smell real flowers

  • Explore nature sensory bags (water mixed with flowers)

Purpose:  Experience natural environmental living things; engage their 5 senses; experience with basic numeration.

Physical Development

  • Reach and/or grab onto hanging blue ribbon and scarves

  • Play hide the caterpillar

  • Squeeze/touch sponges with our hands in blue water

  • Spring sensory play

  • Search for vegetables in Dirt Dough (baking soda, food coloring and water)

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups.

 Arts Appreciation

  • Paint with brown paint mixed with dirt on green paper

  • Paint with green & pink paint on corkboard

  • Manipulate balls in a container with watercolors & wipes

  • Paint on top of flowers

  • “Ladybug” print art

  • Coffee Filter “Butterflies”

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their natural senses.

   Parent Participation

Spring has FINALLY approached us!  Take the opportunity to take advantage of the beautiful outdoors!  There are many great activities that you can do with your little one, such as taking a walk in your neighborhood and discussing what you and your child see, hear, smell, and touch.  Spring is such a beautiful season with all of the flowers blooming, birds chirping, and bugs crawling around.  There is so much to see in your own backyard, forest preserves, and nature parks.

Technology, Health and Safety are incorporated throughout the curriculum with daily interactions and planned activities.

                                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

106-108 Green Newsletter April 2016

106-108 April 2016 Infant Newsletter

Room News:

~ Our theme this month is “Springtime.”  The teachers have collaborated to come up with a variety of activities that will interest the children.

~ Please wish Mia “Happy 1st Birthday!”  Her birthday is on Thursday, April 21st!

~ Please wish George and his family all the best as he transitions into the Toddler I Program!  We will miss you very much!  Good Luck!

 Family Outings:

~ The Chicago Botanical Gardens – Miles of paths to see beautifully designed gardens brimming with plants; twenty-three garden areas showcasing the best plants for the Midwest; native habitat areas featuring native and endangered flora of Illinois. For more information: 1000 Lake Cook Rd.; Glencoe 60022; (847) 835-5440; http://www.chicagobotanic.org/

~ Independence GroveIndependence Grove offers outdoor recreation and education opportunities centered on a 115-acre lake. Surrounding prairie and woodlands provide a picturesque backdrop for hiking, biking, picnicking and other fun activities.  For more information: 16400 W Buckley Rd; Libertyville 60048; (847) 968-3499; http://www.lcfpd.org/IG/

 Timely Topic:  "The Importance of Spring Cleaning"

~ What do most people expect from spring cleaning? – Most people clean in the spring because it’s a tradition or habit they’ve developed because when their house has that clean feeling, it makes them feel better about themselves and their belongings. They get an opportunity to open up the windows and let some fresh air in, something they may not have been able to do since the late fall season (especially those who live in cold weather climates).

~ Who should really do spring cleaning? – Everyone, especially those who suffer from allergies, asthma and other breathing disorders. All winter long the house has been shut and one’s carpet becomes a breeding ground for airborne bacteria, mold spores, dust mite feces, pet dander, cat saliva, pollen, pollutants from ice melt chemicals, mud, dirt, sand and grit that we and our pets bring in from the outside. All of these things get lodged in our carpets, furnishings, bedding and draperies and they need to be cleaned. By reducing these allergens, dust particles and pollutants, we make our homes far healthier than if we didn’t clean it.

~ When and how often should you clean? – You should be as proactive as possible.  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies tells us that our carpets should be cleaned every 6 to 12 months, especially if you have young children and/or if anyone who exhibits a breathing condition.

(Source: http://smallbusinesstrendsetters.com/why-spring-cleaning-is-important-for-health/)

 School News:

~ April 11th-15th: “The Week of the Young Child” – More details to follow.

~ Friday, April 15th: Please join us for our Infant/Toddler Family Breakfast from 7:30am-9am to celebrate the Week of the Young Child. 

Did you know?

 ~ We value the partnerships that we have with our families and recognize the importance of meaningful two-way communication.

 ~ Our school has a beautiful inviting environment that respects our sense of order and provides a refreshing and cheerful place to spend our days.

 ~ The teachers use formal and informal assessments to help track your child’s progress.  These are shared through touch-base phone calls and at conferences.

 ~ At GBN, we pride ourselves on documenting children’s learning.  This is why we call our hallway boards “Documentation Boards” rather than bulletin boards.

101/103 Green Newsletter April 2016

Room 101/103 Green

                                                        Announcements:

*We welcome Becca McDowell and Andrew Slowik with their families to our Infant room. We are delighted to have you!

*Good luck in the Toddler room Carter, Ethan and Hasnain! We will miss you!

   *Friday 4/15/16: Week of the Young Child Infant/Toddler Breakfast    from 7:30-9:00am.        Looking forward to see you!

             

                                                     Did You Know…?

1.      We provide birthday lists and parent directories for your use in mailing birthday party invitations.  We do not allow birthday invitations to be put on cubbies.  Ask Pam to email a directory to you.

2.      We do not allow superhero themed party goods to be brought in for school birthday celebrations.  Speak to your teachers about what is appropriate for school birthday parties.

3.      GBN uses the Ages and Stages questionnaire as a developmental screening tool for each child.

4.     A parent area is located on our GBN website.  Visit www.gbnchildcare.com.  Click on Parent Area.  The User Name is Parent.  The Password is Parent 123.

 

This Month’s Theme: Primary colors: Red, Yellow and Blue (See Curriculum)

Infants may not be able to communicate colors to you, but they can absorb the information for future use.  Even if it seems silly to talk to someone who can’t talk back, it is important in the infant learning process.  Name colors as you go throughout your day-“Roll me the purple ball” or “You are wearing an orange bib.”  The more you say the color names, the more likely your infant will absorb the words themselves and make the connection between work and color.

 

Article: How to Teach Your Baby Colors by Krista Guerrero 

How to Teach Your Baby Colors

By Krista Guerrero  |   Submitted On May 04, 2009

  You don't need to wait until your baby is a specific age to begin teaching them to identify colors. You can begin teaching your baby colors at birth. Your child will always know the names of the different colors without struggling to remember their names, if you use the method described here.

In order to teach your baby the names and identities of different colors, simply make color a part of your conversation. As you dress your baby, tell them what color the dress is that you are putting on them. As you cover them with a blanket tell your baby, "Here is your blue blanket."

As you go about your day, be sure to describe the colors that are around you. As you put away dishes or fold the laundry, tell your baby the different colors you see. When you play with baby, describe the colors of your baby's toys.

This is a simple and easy way to teach your baby all about color. You will be talking to your baby anyway, just be sure to include some descriptive words. Your baby will really benefit from this.

I love to point out the things in our surroundings to my babies. I show them the yellow flowers, the blue sky, the white clouds and the green grass. We look at the different color balloons at the grocery store and talk about the colors of the fruits and vegetables.

I began to do these things with my children at a young age. When my daughter was 10 months old we were playing with her blocks. I was telling her the different colors of the blocks and mixing them up.

I asked her to get me the blue block and she did. I asked her to get me the red block, the yellow block and the green block. She correctly identified these four colors with no hesitation. At this age, she was not speaking, but proved that she was certainly learning and understanding.

Babies are capable of learning so much from birth to five years old. We should not set limits on what we think they can and want to learn.

Krista Guerrero is the founder of Intellectual Baby, LLC, a Florida based company that produces and distributes educational products for babies. The product line includes, DVD's, flash cards, toys, books, and more. Its founder, Krista Guerrero, taught her son to read as an infant. Having taught reading for many years, she discovered that babies are capable of learning to read easier and faster than school-aged children. Her proven techniques have been incorporated into the "Monki See Monki Doo" system. To get your free report "How to Have a Smarter Baby", visit http://www.intellbaby.com/babies-can-read.html

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Krista_Guerrero/277673

 

101/103 Green Curriculum April 2016- Primary colors: Red, Yellow, Blue

 

      Literacy/Language

Vocabulary: Colors, Red, Yellow, blue

  Books:  Happy Baby Colors by Priddy Books

             Colors by Innovative Kids

             Animals in Color by Sabastiano Ranchetti

             The Colors of Us by Karen Katz

 *Nurture children’s natural desire to read and write

 

       Creative Expression

Activities:  Sing“Little Red Wagon”

                            “Who is wearing Blue today…”

                            “Five Green and speckled frogs”

              Dance with colored scarves

              Dance with colored rattles and shakers               

*Demonstrate the desire and develop the ability to engage, interact and build relationships with familiar adults and peers

 

 Science/Social Studies/ Math

 

Activities:  Roll red balls down the ramp

                   Work on color puzzles

                   Let children explore with food coloring and water

                   Sorting and counting color links

 

*Children are building the foundation for problem solving through active exploration and social interaction       

 

 

 Physical Development: Movement /Outdoor

 

Activities:  Pick up different colored items and place them in buckets

                Visit the fish tank to see the colored fish

Let children roll around and crinkle up red/yellow colored butcher paper

Let children reach for and touch different colored items    on wall mirror

*Provide an environment where the child can observe and explore

 

 

­    Art Appreciation: Art/Sensory

 

  Activities:  Mix red and yellow paint to make orange, mix blue and

                     yellow to make green        

                   Tie-dye activity using wet wipes and paint

                     Add colored ice cubes to water table

                     Color a cardboard box using red crayons

 

*Provide opportunities to build imagination and creativity.

 

 

”    Parent Participation

 

 Parent Involvement Opportunities:

 

Friday, April 22nd is RED day!  Please dress your child in Red!

 

*As you dress her/him up in the morning you can say, “You are going to wear a red outfit today. I hope you like it…” It is important in their learning process.

 

 

101/103 Green Newsletter March 2016

 

Announcements


*On Thursday, March 17th, meet and greet with Karen Crawford, our school nurse from 4:30-5:45 p.m. All are welcome to attend with any questions.

*Please note that our school will be closed on Friday, March 25th for Spring Break Day. Enjoy the long week-end!

 

Did You Know…?

 

1.     GBN is a cell phone free zone.  We value and respect children so we avoid distractions.

2.     Parents are responsible for their children upon signing out in the evening.  Please exit the building by the 6 p.m. closing time.

3.     At GBN, we practice fire drills, severe weather drills, and lock down drills.

4.     We require that family members and visitors park only in designated parking spaces to avoid accidents.

 

This Month’s Theme: “Play Ball” (See Curriculum)

 Balls can be a wonderful learning tool for young children. Even the youngest infant can improve their fine motor skills and attention span while reaching for, grasping and staring at an interesting ball. An older infant can begin to push a ball back and forth with an adult, learning about cause and effect and improving literacy skills by listening to what an adult is saying. A toddler can walk with a ball, drop it and watch it bounce.

 Article: “Play Ball” from Sears Parenting Library

http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/parenting/child-rearing-and-development/bright-starts-babys-development-through-interactive-play/playtime-articles

“Play Ball!”  By Dr. Sears

 In a world of electronic toys with flashing lights and stimulating sounds, it’s easy to forget about the classic simple toys that have been around for centuries. The Ball is one such toy. It’s so simple, and yet so versatile. It delights kids of every age. Its uses grow and change as a child develops and discovers new uses and games to play. Balls are perfect for solo play, one on one with a parent, or in a whole group of kids. Here are some great ideas you can use to interact with your baby during playtime while stimulating baby’s motor and social developmental skills:

Start young. Small, hard rubber or plastic balls are great toys for a growing infant starting around three months of age. Baby is just learning to push up on her tummy and lift her head up high to see what is on the floor in front of her. Baby is also practicing her reaching and grasping skills. At this age, baby is learning the “palmar” grasp – she is grabbing things with her whole hand (finger grasping comes later). A small ball, about 1 ½ to 2 inches across, will fit perfectly into baby’s tiny grasp. A few colorful balls placed in front of baby on the floor will stimulate her pushing up, reaching and grabbing skills. Babies also love to explore items with their mouths, and firm rubber, plastic, or even soft plush balls are favorites for baby’s curious mouth.

Sitting up. Around six months of age baby is beginning to sit up without falling over. This is the perfect time for parents to begin one-on-one ball play with baby. Sit in front of baby on the floor and roll a ball towards him. His reaching and aiming skills will get a great work out as he pounces on each ball that comes his way. Baby is also learning to transfer objects back and forth between hands. Watch as baby picks up a ball with one hand, passes it to the other, and then brings it to his mouth for a taste. Then roll in a second ball and watch as baby grabs it too. A third ball rolled into the game really begins to stimulate baby’s thinking. Watch as baby realizes he is out of hands, puts down one ball to pick up the third. This exercise really enhances baby’s decision processing skills. Of course baby is also teething at this age, so make sure the balls are small enough for baby to soothe his sore gums on, but big enough so they don’t fit completely into baby’s mouth.

Talk it up. As you play ball with baby, be sure to verbalize what you are doing. The word “ball” is such an easy word for baby to learn to say, since “ba” is often one of the first babbling sounds baby makes. Playfully say the word “ball” to baby throughout your playtime. As baby grows, add actions to your words, such as “roll the ball”, “bounce the ball” and “get the ball”. Baby will learn what these words mean much faster if you associate the words with actions as you play.

Around nine months of age baby begins to learn about object permanence – the ball still exists even though you’ve hidden it behind your back. Playing “where’s the ball” together is a great way to stimulate baby’s curiosity.

As baby grows into a toddler, balls are perfect for teaching baby her colors. Place a variety of colored balls in front of baby and show her “this is the RED ball”, etc. Then test baby’s learning by asking her to pick up each color in turn. Start out with only two colors and work your way up as baby learns.

Play ball. Around fifteen months, or once baby is walking well, it’s time to really play ball. Most babies will automatically learn to throw a ball themselves, and you can join in the fun and through back and forth. Be sure to keep a variety of ball types and sizes around for baby’s varying moods and skills. Large beach balls are great for two-handed picking up and throwing, as well as kicking. Large rubber inflated balls are perfect for bouncing fun. Smaller plastic balls will give baby’s arm a good workout. As you join baby in his throwing, bouncing, and rolling play, encourage his advanced actions by verbalizing “kick kick kick!”, “bounce bounce” or “good throw!” For any sports fans, turn on football, baseball, basketball, or whatever sport you enjoy, buy baby her own ball to match, and include your child in what you are watching. Then join her on the floor to teach her how each game is played with its own unique ball. Getting your child interested in sports early on will enhance her motor skills and may generate interests that will keep her active as she grows through childhood. And be sure to take the game outside as often as you can. Outside play keeps you both in shape.

 

101/103/Green Curriculum March 2016- Project Theme: "Play Ball"

Literacy/Language

Vocabulary: Ball, Roll, Bounce, Throw, Catch

Books: - “The Berenstain Bears Go Out For The Team” by Stan and

  Jan Berenstain

              - “Froggy Plays Soccer” by Jonathan London

              - “Froggy Plays T-Ball” by Jonathan London

             - “Shapes and Colors” by Waldman Publishing

* Focuses attention while looking at printed materials for brief periods of time

 

Creative Expression: Music/Drama

Songs:  - “Take me out to the ball game”                      

- “Uno, dos, tres amigos” (refer to the Infant sing along handout)

- “If you are happy and you know it roll the ball”

Music: Bounce ball to rhythm of music/song playing

Dramatic Play: - “How big is ……so big”

               - Play peek-a-boo with balls and scarves

* Children demonstrate the ability to convey ideas and emotions

 

Science/Social Studies/ Math

 Outdoor activities:

- Hide balls in sandbox and allow children to find them.

- Find things that are round like balls

Indoor activities: - See which balls sink or float in water

- Fill and dump cupcake trays with balls

- Match ball sizes and their colors

 

* Children show interest and eagerness in learning about their world

 

Physical Development: Indoor Outdoor Movement

Activities: Free play with variety of balls

                 Roll a ball on different surfaces

                 Fill the “pool” with different balls

                 Encourage children to put/throw balls into basket

* Practice emerging skills in coordination, movement and balance and controlled use of large muscles

 

Arts Appreciation: Art/Sensory

- Finger painting on bubble wrap

- Dip balls in paint and roll on a piece of construction paper

- Feel textured balls vs. smooth

- Splash with balls in the sensory table  

* Art and sensory activities will inspire children and spark their imagination   

 

 Parent Participation

   Parent Involvement Opportunities:

  Practice gross-motor ball play activities at home.

         Roll, kick, throw a ball back and forth with your child.                                           

106-108 Green Newsletter March 2016

106-108 March 2016 Newsletter

Room News:

~ Our theme for this month is “Dr. Seuss”.  The teachers have collaborated to come up with a variety of activities that will interest the children.

 Family Outings:

~ Cosley Zoo – Get up close to a large variety of domestic farm animals and native Illinois wildlife. You'll see cows, horses, sheep, goats, llamas, deer, birds, raccoons, rabbits, chickens, pigs, birds of prey, coyotes, burro and foxes. Offers paved pathways which are accessible for strollers and persons with disabilities. Cosley Zoo Information: 1356 Gary Ave.; Wheaton 60187; (630) 665-5534; http://cosleyzoo.org/

~ Skokie Public Library – Come enjoy our great spaces, collections, and services for babies through 8th graders.  Check out all the kid-friendly areas in our first floor: Youth Services area. Infants are able to hang out safely in their very own Baby Garden.  Children can listen to a story in our Program Room, make fun projects in our well-stocked Craft Room, or play with Lego’s or puppets in the Preschool Area.  Skokie Public Library Information: 5215 Oakton St.; Skokie 60077; 847-673-7774; https://skokielibrary.info/

 Timely Topic: Consistent Care at Home and Child Care Centers

~ Maintaining consistent routines and experiences for children across home and childcare is important for a variety of reasons.  Having elements of familiarity can relieve children’s anxiety about separating from their family.  Continuity helps children predict what is going to happen next and encourages them to feel as though they have a sense of control over what is occurring in their environment.  This empowers children and supports their developing independence.

~ While childcare centers should try to accommodate your child’s specific needs, it is important to understand that the individual attention that your child receives at home may not always be replicated in a group care environment.  Childcare professionals must implement practices that comply with licensing regulations, quality assurance standards and what is currently the recommended best practice(s) for children.  As such, childcare professionals may not be able to meet all requests from families for specific, individualized practices.

~ By working together with your child care professionals to combine the knowledge that you [as the parents] can offer about your child with the experience and formal training of your childcare professionals, a range of routines and strategies can be developed that will work both at home and in group care.  (Source: “Bridging the Gap Between Home and Child Care” by Georgia McKay)

 School News:

~ Thursday, March 17th from 4:30-5:45 pm: Come to our “Meet and Greet” with our school nurse, Karen Crawford. Please bring any questions/concerns you may have!

~ Friday, March 25th: GBN is closed for our Spring Break Day.  Enjoy your 3-day weekend with your family!  We will reopen on Monday, March 28th.

Did you know?

 ~ GBN has an open door policy – you are welcome to visit your child during the day.   We also have phones in every classroom for both parent and teacher convenience.

~ GBN uses the Ages and Stages (ASQ) questionnaire as a developmental screening tool for each child.

~ A parent area is located on our GBN website.  Visit www.gbnchildcare.com.  Click on Parent Area. The user name is Parent, and the password is Parent 123.

The Nielsen Center is play based and encourages children’s learning through exploration and discovery.

106-108 March 2016 Lesson Plan

106-108 March 2016 Lesson Plan

Dr. Seuss

 

 

Literacy/Language

  • Read: The Cat in the Hat
  • Read: The Shape of Me and Other Stuff
  • Read: Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You?
  • Read: Green Eggs and Ham
  • Read: Ten Apples up on Top
  • Read: If I Ran the Zoo
  • Read: Hop on Pop

Purpose:  Expose children to oral language and books.

Creative Expression

  • Sing: “Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!”

  • Sing: “Old Macdonald Had a Farm”
  • Sing:  “ABC’s”
  • Sing: “Wocket in my Pocket
  • Fingerplay: “1 Little, 2 Little, 3 Little Apples…”
  • Fingerplay: “Cat in the Hat”
  • Fingerplay: ““Goes with Fox on Sox”
Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.

Science/Social Studies/ Math

  • Make ooblek using cornstarch and water
  • Playing with the zoo animals
  • Counting 10 apples in Spanish using the overhead projector.
  • Look at our shadows with the overhead projector.
  • Trace our body outline on butcher paper
  • Touch red, yellow, green and blue frozen gloves for sensory
  • Explore paper-mache (flour, water, and newspaper strips)

Purpose: Experience natural environmental living things; engage their 5 senses; experience with basic numeration.

Physical Development

  • Reach and pop bubbles

  • Explore textured balls

  • Practice kicking and moving our feet

  • Roll our bodies from back to belly and belly to back

  • Move suction cupped toys on the floor or countertop

  • Explore how many blocks can balance before falling

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups.

Arts Appreciation

  • Painting with apples

  • Mixing blue and yellow to make green

  • Hand painting with red and white paint

  • Visual Art: look at red and blue fish projected on the wall

  • Paint with yellow paint using our feet

  • Roll textured balls through black paint onto white paper

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.

Parent Participation

Dr. Seuss had a clever and innate knowledge of how to make reading fun and engaging for young children.  His books all have some sort of learning value or lesson in them.  Take a trip to the library or check online to see the immense amount of books he authored during his career.  Encourage your child to explore their creative and imaginative sides just as Dr. Seuss did with his silly limericks and stories.

Technology, Health and Safety are incorporated throughout the curriculum with daily interactions and planned activities.

102/104 Green Newsletter March 2016

102/104 Green March Newsletter 2016

              ANNOUNCEMENTS

This Month’s Theme: This month’s theme will be “Start Your Engines”.  The children will be reading books about cars, trucks, and all different kinds of transportation. They will get to roll toy cars through paint and shaving cream, and even wash the paint off using sponges in the sensory table. We will sing songs like ‘The Wheels on the Bus’ and get the chance to paint a cardboard box that we will turn into a pretend car for our classroom.

Lesson Plan: Please see reverse side for this month’s curriculum. 

Welcome: Please help us all in welcoming Riley Yoon and his family to Room 102-104! He started Monday, February 29th, and we are thrilled to have him. Nicholas DeBartolo and his family are also a new addition to our classroom! Nicholas will be starting on Monday, March 7th in 104 and we are very excited to have him.

School Announcements: On Thursday, March 17th, from 4:30-5:45, there will be a meet-and-greet for parents with our school nurse, Karen Crawford. Feel free to come with any questions you may have for her.

- Our center will be closed on Friday, March 25th, for Spring Break. We will reopen on Monday, March 28th. Have a wonderful long weekend!

 

TIDBIT OF THE MONTH:

Self-Soothing Techniques

www.babycenter.com 

How do I teach my baby to sooth himself to sleep?

You can't really teach your baby how to self-soothe, but you can provide him with the opportunity to teach himself. Given the right circumstances and the right stage of development, usually between 3 and 6 months of age, it will happen on its own. It's like learning to crawl: If you always carry your baby, he'll never have a chance to discover crawling, since he'll never be on the floor long enough to figure it out. It's the same thing with self-soothing: If you always nurse or rock your baby to sleep, he'll never have a chance to learn how to soothe himself to sleep.

How can you help your baby do this? First, you need to set the stage, which includes two things: a regular bedtime and a consistent routine. A bedtime that occurs at the same time every night will set your baby's internal clock so that he's naturally sleepy at a predictable time. The bedtime routine should happen in the place you want your baby to sleep and include three or four soothing activities, such as taking a bath, reading a story and having a cuddle, that let him know it's time for "night-night." When the bedtime routine is finished, put your baby to bed drowsy but awake.

Many babies will surprise you and drift off to sleep without much protest. Other babies, especially older ones who may have come to depend on being nursed or rocked to sleep, will need a bit of practice. Remember, self-soothing is just like crawling — it takes time and opportunity. You can teach your baby all at once and wait outside your baby's room, checking on him as frequently or infrequently as you wish. Or you can make it a more gradual process, sitting next to your baby's crib and easing yourself farther away each night — sitting in the middle of the room, sitting in the doorway and so on.

If your baby is used to breast- or bottle-feeding as he goes to sleep in your arms, you'll have to break his need to suck to sleep. You can move your child's feeding to earlier in the bedtime routine or slowly reduce the number of ounces or number of minutes of this feeding. Or when you see your baby starting to drift off during a feeding, promptly end his meal and finish the rest of the bedtime routine before laying him down.

Although some people believe that you should never wake a sleeping baby, keep the big picture in mind. On any particular night, waking your baby after he's drifted off may seem crazy, especially when you're beat and have a million things to do before turning in yourself. But when you remember your long-term goal of helping your baby develop the ability to soothe himself to sleep, both at bedtime and when he naturally wakes up during the night, it's well worth doing.

What happens if you've given your baby plenty of chances to self-soothe and he just can't seem to do it? Take a step back and try to figure out why. Perhaps he's simply too young and doesn't yet have the developmental ability to self-soothe, just as a 3-month-old can spend hours on the living room floor yet still won't be able to crawl .In this case, wait a few days, weeks or even months before trying again.

Or maybe your baby is too tired — and thus too overwrought — to settle down by himself. In this case, try moving his bedtime a bit earlier so he isn't a complete wreck by lights-out. Finally, think about whether you're really giving your baby an opportunity to find ways to soothe himself, or are rushing in to comfort him at his first peep and depriving him of the chance to figure it out on his own.

Most important, keep your goal in mind: Developing the ability to soothe himself to sleep will enable your baby to snooze for longer stretches and put himself back to sleep when he naturally wakes up during the night, allowing him to get the rest he needs to grow and thrive. What's more, self-soothing is an important life skill that will serve your baby well not just at bedtime but also in other situations, such as when he's separated from you at daycare or even when you momentarily walk out of the room, when he gets frustrated trying to master all those other important skills such as — you guessed it — crawling, or when he's just feeling fussy.

 

                                       Have a great month!

                                                                                         Lana, Erin, Katie & Madi

 

102/104 Green Lesson Plan March 2016

Literacy/Language 

Books: Where Do Diggers Sleep at Night? by Brianna Caplan Sayers

             My Big Truck Book by Roger Priddy

             Pop-Up Peekaboo! Things That Go by Dorling Kindersley

             Boats by Byron Barton

Purpose: Expose children to oral language and books. 

     

Creative Expression:

Songs: ‘The Wheels on the Bus’

             ‘Row, Row, Row Your Boat’

             ‘I’ve Been Working on the Railroad’

             ‘We All Live in a Yellow Submarine’

Dramatic Play: Playing with toy cars, airplanes, fire trucks, and buses

Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.   

    

Science/Social Studies/Math:

Activities:   Rolling cars down the ramp

                   Floating toy boats in water in the sensory table

                    Washing paint off of truck wheels with sponges

                    Pushing cars over bumpy bubble wrap on the floor                

Purpose: Experience with numeration; engage their senses of touch & listening.   

   

Physical Development:

 Activities:  Stroller rides in the hallways and outside

                    Pushing cardboard boxes across the floor

                    Pushing cars and trucks through tunnels

                    Dancing to music in the classroom        

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups.   

    

­    Arts Appreciation:

  Activities: Toy boats in colored water in the sensory table

                     Rolling cars and truck wheels in paint to make patterns

                     Rolling cars and trucks through shaving cream

                     Painting a cardboard box “car” to climb in and out of         

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.      

  

”    Parent Participation: 

  Point out different kinds of transportation vehicles to your children. We will be talking about school buses, dump trucks and airplanes in our classroom, but being able to see them and point them out to your kids will bridge the gap between school and home!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

106-108 Green Lesson Plan February 2016

"Our Five Senses"

February 2016 Curriculum Plan

Literacy/Language

  • Read: "Touch and Feel:123 "

  • Read: "The Eye Book" by Dr. Seuss

  • Read: "I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!" by Dr. Seuss

  • Read: "The Nose Book" by Al Perkins

  • Read: "The Ear Book" by Al Perkins

  • Read: "A Taste of Honey" by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Purpose:  Expose children to oral language and books.

Creative Expression

  • Sing: “The Five Senses Song”

  • Sing: “My Five Senses”

  • Sing: “What Can I See…?”

  • Fingerplay: “This Little Piggy Went to the Market”

  • Fingerplay: “I Use My Five Senses”

  • Fingerplay: “Our Five Senses”

 Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.

Physical Development

  • Roll or kick sensory balls or objects on the floor

  • Shake wristbands with bells

  • Splash water with our feet or hands

  • Watch and/or reach for floating bubbles

  • Practice grabbing or feeling loofas

  • Practice grabbing our toes on our backs

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups. 

Arts Appreciation

  • Paint with our feet

  • Paint over our reflection on the wall mirror

  • Use ink pads to make hand prints or footprints on paper

  • Paint using a paper towel roll

  • Listen to different musical instruments

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.

Science/Social Studies/ Math

  • Smell: Smell sensory jars with safe/various scents

  • Touch: Explore tactile posters on the floor

  • Sight and Touch: Explore colorful pasta

  • Hear and Sight: Practice counting with our fingers

  • Taste: Eat our food and/or our formula and/or breast milk

  • Hear: Listen to a story read by the teachers

Purpose: Experience natural environmental living things; engage their senses of touch; experience with basic numeration.

 Parent Participation

 

An infant uses its five senses both to get accustomed with their environment and to achieve comfort.  Every baby goes about this differently.  You and your child could explore the natural world using all five of their senses: i.e. tasting new foods/drinking from the bottle; listening to the sounds around them; watching what’s moving near and far; smelling different scents at home or school; and feeling various textures on their skin.  These will all help facilitate in the growth of your child’s development throughout their infancy.

**Technology, Health and Safety are incorporated throughout the curriculum with daily interactions and planned activities.**

101/103 News Letter Feb 2016

                           Announcements

 Wednesday Feb 17th 2016 from 4:30-5:45 we will have a Pot-Luck event for our infant parents.

We welcome Ezra Patterson and his parents, James and Karena to our Infant Room. We are happy that you are here.

 

                                Did You Know?…

  1. Gertrude B. Nielsen is a peanut free zone.
  2. We request that parents and children wash their hands upon entering the classroom.  This helps keep our children, families and staff healthy.
  3. Allstate offers the use of their internal road system for Nielsen’s family’s safety and convenience.  Ask the front desk about the safest route to and from our Center using the Allstate road.
  4. Tuition is due each Monday if paid weekly and by the 8th day of the month if paid monthly.

 

This Month’s Theme: Let’s make Music

 Music plays a vital role in an infant’s brain development in numerous ways.Various studies have shown and proven that early exposure to music increases an infant’s abilities in many academic areas, including math and language development.  Early exposure to music also serves as a positive impact on an infant’s physical development, particularly with premature infants.  Early music exposure for infants can be the road to calm and self-soothing baby.

 


                                     Article:

Building Baby’s Brain: The Role of Music” by Diane Bales, Ph.D.

The Importance of Music in a Baby’s Brain Development


  It is just NEVER to early to start children on music.  (I had fun adding pics of my own kids playing around when they were little.)  Enjoy reading about these simple, yet effective ways to build those sweet little brains.  

My son Zach at age 2

Music has an influence over everyone’s emotions, young and old alike. As adults, we know certain types of upbeat music will lift our spirits, while slow, sad songs may send us on a tearful trip down memory lane. But music also has a much deeper affect on our brains. In fact, research (Diane Bales, Ph.D.) has shown music plays an important role in a baby’s brain development. Music, singing or playing an instrument does not necessarily make a child smarter, but it does improve cognitive skills, which in turn lead to developmental advancements at every stage of life.

How Music Works
We are all born with billions of brain cells. During the infant and childhood years, those brain cells form connections with each other. As we grow, the brains connections we use most often become the strongest. Listening to music helps strengthen the music related cell connections which strengthen thinking and reasoning skills.

Turn on the radio or your iPad and listen to some music. As soon as the first note is played, your brain begins to think and reason what the name of the song is, the timing of the first word in conjunction with the music, the name of the band or singer and recalls all the words to a favorite song so you can sing along. Several other subconscious thinking skills were involved with you being able to sing along to a favorite song. Those skills were encouraged and created when you were a baby and listened to music.

Get Baby Rocking
Experts are in semi-agreement to what kind of music helps a baby’s brain develop best. All agree that classical music is the best due to the complex structure of the musical composition. However, most of them also agree while Mozart and Beethoven are the best, pop, country and even a little rock and roll will strengthen brain cell connections.

My daughter Grace at age 1

Play Music
A simple thing like turning the radio on in the nursery can help your baby become smarter. Keep soft music playing in the background while baby plays or naps. While the music plays, brains cells are connecting and outside noise is blocked so Baby can sleep more soundly. The type of music will also impact a baby or child’s mood, so be selective about the music you chose. A lullaby will soothe a baby or toddler while a heavy metal beat may increase activity and energy level.

Sing To Baby
Sing to your baby to accelerate brain development. Your baby or child will not care if you don’t sing well, and it’s a great way to have bonding and play time with your child. Sing all the baby lullabies and silly childhood songs that you loved as a child (which you remember because of the strong musical brain cell connections) and your child will love them too.

Early Music Lessons
If you plan on providing music lessons for your child, start early. Even very young children can learn to keep rhythm on a tambourine or maracas. Introduce them to the piano, drums or other instrument before they start school to help foster a love for music and strong thinking skills that will serve them well throughout their lifetime.

Nick Hernandez writes about child development, parenting and education. His best work is about online education degrees.

Related posts:

 

 

101/103 Lesson Plan Feb 2016

 

                 Literacy/Language

Vocabulary: clap, shake, play, loud, soft

 Books: 

-         Down by the Station by Jennifer Riggs Vetter

-         The Itsy Bitsy Spider interpreted by Iza Trapani

-         Peter Rabbit’s Lullabies by DK Publishers

-         Book of Nursery Rhymes by Ian Penney

~ Children demonstrate interest in and comprehension of printed materials.

 

      Creative Expression: Music/Drama

Songs:   “Five Little Monkeys”; “The Muffin Man”

        “Pat-a-Cake”; “The Wheels on the Bus”

Music:              - Play music on CD from different cultures

              - Use different instruments to create music

Dramatic Play: Mimic different movements to the rhythm of the music playing on CD

~ Children demonstrate the ability to convey ideas and emotions through creative expression

 

             Science/Social Studies/ Math

Science:  On the stroller ride, listen to the birds chirp in the aviary

 

Social Studies: With the children, sit, kneel, or stand with them as you clap, sing, snap, stomp, jump, dance, etc.

 

Math: Practice counting as we clap our hands and stomp our feet

 

~ Children demonstrate interest and eagerness in learning about their world

 

 

    Physical Development: Movement /Outdoor

Activities: -

- Sing songs to the children on a stroller ride outside (weather permitting)

-Sway back and forth like the wind using colored scarves

-Take musical instruments outside to play on the playground (weather permitting)

~ An opportunity to be aware how objects and people move and fit in space. Also develop language and cognitive skills.

 

                                    Art Appreciation: Art/Sensory

Activities:

- Finger paint while the music is playing in the classroom

- Paint with soft colors and bold colors

- Wash our instruments in the sensory bin

- Explore different cultural instruments in the sensory bin

 

~ Finding their creative ways to make art will inspire children and spark their imagination

 

 

”            Parent Participation

 

Parent Involvement Opportunities:

 

- If your child has a favorite CD that he or she likes to listen to at home, please bring it in to share with the classroom.

- Play a game of “Floaty Scarf”: fling a scarf in the air and let your child watch it settle or land on their head or the floor

- Sing songs to your child in the car, at the dinner table, in the bath, before bed, etc. 

 

 

 

 

102/104 Green Lesson Plan February 2016

 This Month's Theme: Shapes & Colors!

Literacy/Language:

 Books:  Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr.

              A Color of His Own by Leo Lionni

  Happy Baby Colors by Roger Priddy

  Color Zoo by Lois Ehlert

Purpose: Expose children to oral language and books.

   

Creative Expression:

Songs:  Little Red Wagon

             Somewhere Over the Rainbow

             There’s A Color We All Know

              Yellow Submarine

Dramatic Play: Exploring with colored scarves and fabrics

Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.   

 

 Science/Social Studies/Math:

   Activities:  Playing in colored water in the sensory table

                     Building with colored blocks

                     Counting multi-colored links

                     Observing colored water bottle “lava lamps”         

     Purpose: Experience with numeration; engage their senses of touch & listening.       

      

Physical Development:

 Activities:   Manipulating colored butcher-block paper

                     Playing in a pool of plastic balls

                     Climbing in and out of colored cardboard boxes

                     Chasing and popping big round bubbles               

      Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups. 

     

­    Arts Appreciation:

  Activities:   Mixing paints to create new colors

                     Rolling colored balls in paint

                     Painting using hands and feet

                     Using colored ink pads                 

    Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.  

    

”    Parent Participation:

Each Friday of the month we will have a ‘Color Day’ to celebrate all the colors we learned about by wearing them to school! 

Friday, February 5th: Blue Day!

Friday, February 12th: Red Day!

Friday, February 19th: Green Day!

            Friday, February 26th: Wear your favorite color today!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

102/104 Green Newsletter February 2016

ANNOUNCEMENTS

This Month’s Theme: This month’s theme will be “Shapes & Colors.”  The children will be introduced and become familiar with different colors and shapes.  They will manipulate small colored blocks, push fire trucks across the floor, and explore colored water in the sensory table and paint with our hands and feet.  We will also read some books and sings songs about shapes and colors. The children and teachers will also have special days to dress in their favorite colors!

Lesson Plan: Please see reverse side for this month’s curriculum.

Special Announcement: On Wednesday, February 17th, from 4:30-5:45, we will host our annual Infant Family Potluck! It will be a great chance to have fun with your child and socialize with other infant parents and children from other classrooms. We hope to see you all there!

Tidbit of the Month

Color Changes in Your Baby’s Stool

Babies.com

 All parents acquire a sudden interest in their baby’s stool. “Should I be concerned when the color is green, yellow or black? Is my breast milk or formula causing an issue? Is there something wrong with my baby’s digestion?” These are some of the questions parents ask regarding baby health. The following are the basics to get a parent through a baby or kids health in regard to the color of his or her bowel movement.

The minute a newborn is delivered, the parents expel a hefty sigh of relief. However, for most parents, that feeling will not last long. A throbbing soft spot, birthmarks, jaundice, crossed eyes, skin rashes, and various bumps can all be very scary to a parent. The color of a baby’s bowel movement is a common health concern.

About Bowel Movements

A baby’s first bowel movement is called meconium. It is of a greenish black color and is thick and sticky. The color and consistency of the first bowel movement should never be seen again and doesn’t indicate bad baby health. It is normal and is actually a positive sign of a baby’s health.

After this first stool, all other stools will be affected by what is fed to the baby. The baby swallows fluid, which is digested by stomach acid and then moves into the small intestine. The digested nutritional matter and water are absorbed into the bloodstream, and the larger pieces of fiber and other matter continue through the intestines. If the larger pieces of matter travel through the intestines at a slow pace, the water will be absorbed, and the bowel movement will be firm. If the larger matter travels at a fast rate through the intestines, the bowel movements will be loose. The bowel movements will also pick up digestive juices, bacteria, bile, and other substances, which impact the odor and color of the stool.

The Effects of Breast Milk vs. Formula

Breast milk is usually absorbed completely, and it is not uncommon for a baby to not have a bowel movement for a couple of days. This is not any indication of the baby health and is totally normal. When a breast-fed infant has a bowel movement, it is usually a mustard yellow seedy-looking stool. At first, a baby will have a bowel movement after each feeding, and that will taper off as more meals are consumed.

Infants that are bottle-fed tend to have darker and less frequent stool. Every baby is different, and there are a large variety of normal colored bowel movements. In normal babies, bowel movements will change color as the diet of the baby changes, as the digestive system matures, and as normal bacteria develop. It is a rare occurrence that a bowel movement color change would indicate a digestive issue. The color changes usually just mean that there are more or less colored pigments picked up in the digestive tract.

Rare Stool Colors

Chalky white bowel movements could mean that there is no liver bile being made to digest food. If white stool is seen, the parent should contact a physician, and further tests will probably be ordered.

A dark tar-black bowel movement may indicate blood in the digestive tract. The dark color indicates that the blood traveled far in the intestines, turning from bright red to black as it traveled. If this color stool is seen, one should contact a physician, and again, further tests will probably be ordered.

A bright red bowel movement indicates that some blood came from a spot close to the anus. It is important to note that a red stool can also be brought on by medications, food coloring in foods, and beets. If needed, a test can be done on a baby’s stool to check for abnormalities.

In summary, parents need not worry about orange, yellow, or green bowel movements. They are usually not a sign of any digestive problems and signal more about the foods that the baby consumes.

 

Have a great month!

Erin, Lana, Katie, & Madi

106-108 Green Newsletter February 2016

106-108 February 2016 Newsletter

Room News:

~ Our theme for this month is “Our Five Senses”.  The teachers have collaborated to come up with a variety of activities that will interest the children.

~ Please welcome Elizabeth (Libby) Dallia and her parents, Catherine and Michael to Room 108.  We are excited you all have joined our classroom! We would also like to welcome Oliver Macias to room 106.  We are excited that you are here!

 Family Outings:

~ Kohl’s Children Museum – Offers more than a dozen interactive and hands-on exhibits and programs for young children.  Kohl’s Children Museum Information: 2100 Patriot Boulevard; Glenview 60026; (847) 832-6600; http://www.kohlchildrensmuseum.org/

~ Wheeling Indoor Arctic Pool – Offers a zero-depth leisure pool, a toddler slide, interactive water play structures, and a mini-lazy river all indoors!  Wheeling Indoor Arctic Pool Information: 333 W. Dundee Road; Wheeling 60090; 847/465-7674; www.wheelingparkdistrict.com/arctic-splash

 Timely Topic: Healthy Growth and Development

~ An Infant’s physical development unfolds quickly from birth. Newborns come into this world as fragile bundles in need of gentle handling, holding, head and neck support. Within three months time, infant’s necks and upper torsos strengthen to support their heads.

 ~ Infants continue to strengthen and develop throughout their first year from their heads to their feet as they go from prone to upright to standing; from uncontrolled large arm movements to deliberate reaching to picking up small bits of food with their finger tips.

 ~ The early learning environment plays a crucial role in development.  Infants early learning is optimized when they have time and safe spaces to explore their natural curiosities and when trusted caregivers are there to describe, interpret, and encourage these explorations (source: Gail Conway, M.Ed.).

 School News:

~ Come join us for the Infant-Wing Potluck and Sing-a-long will be on Wednesday, February 17th from 4:30-5:45 pm!  We will have a sing-a-long session in the mini-gym and a potluck feast in the classrooms.  A potluck food sign-up sheet will be posted on the clipboard in the next few weeks.  More information will follow.

Did you know?:

 ~ GBN has an open door policy – you are welcome to visit your child during the day.   We also have phones in every classroom for both parent and teacher convenience.

 ~ GBN is a peanut-free zone.

 ~ Karen Crawford is a registered nurse and has been Nielsen’s health nurse consultant since January 2004.  She graduated from Northern Illinois University.

 ~ The curriculum is literacy-rich, play-based, and project-oriented.

 

101/103 Lesson Plan Feb 2016

            Literacy/Language

Vocabulary: clap, shake, play, loud, soft

 Books: 

-         Down by the Station by Jennifer Riggs Vetter

-         The Itsy Bitsy Spider interpreted by Iza Trapani

-         Peter Rabbit’s Lullabies by DK Publishers

-         Book of Nursery Rhymes by Ian Penney

~ Children demonstrate interest in and comprehension of printed materials.

 

      Creative Expression: Music/Drama

Songs:   “Five Little Monkeys”; “The Muffin Man”

        “Pat-a-Cake”; “The Wheels on the Bus”

Music:              - Play music on CD from different cultures

              - Use different instruments to create music

Dramatic Play: Mimic different movements to the rhythm of the music playing on CD

~ Children demonstrate the ability to convey ideas and emotions through creative expression

 

             Science/Social Studies/ Math

Science:  On the stroller ride, listen to the birds chirp in the aviary

Social Studies: With the children, sit, kneel, or stand with them as you clap, sing, snap, stomp, jump, dance, etc.

 

Math: Practice counting as we clap our hands and stomp our feet

 

~ Children demonstrate interest and eagerness in learning about their world

 

 

    Physical Development: Movement /Outdoor

Activities: -

- Sing songs to the children on a stroller ride outside (weather permitting)

-Sway back and forth like the wind using colored scarves

-Take musical instruments outside to play on the playground (weather permitting)

~ An opportunity to be aware how objects and people move and fit in space. Also develop language and cognitive skills.

 

                                    Art Appreciation: Art/Sensory

Activities:

- Finger paint while the music is playing in the classroom

- Paint with soft colors and bold colors

- Wash our instruments in the sensory bin

- Explore different cultural instruments in the sensory bin

 

~ Finding their creative ways to make art will inspire children and spark their imagination

 

 

”            Parent Participation

 

Parent Involvement Opportunities:

 

- If your child has a favorite CD that he or she likes to listen to at home, please bring it in to share with the classroom.

- Play a game of “Floaty Scarf”: fling a scarf in the air and let your child watch it settle or land on their head or the floor

- Sing songs to your child in the car, at the dinner table, in the bath, before bed, etc.