INFANT – 106/108 GREEN

106-108 Green Lesson Play April 2016

106-108 April 2016

Monthly Curriculum Plan

Literacy/Language

  • Read: Baby Loves Spring by Karen Katz

  • Read: Spring is Here by Will Hillenbrand

  • Read: Countdown to Spring by Janet Sabalman

  • Read: My Spring Robin by Anne Rockwell

  • Read: The Spring Rabbit by Jorge Dunber

  • Read: The Start of Spring by Frederick Warm

  • Read: Wake Up, It’s Spring by Lisa Campbell Ernst

Purpose:  Expose children to oral language and books.

Creative Expression

  • Sing:  “If All the Raindrops”

  • Sing:  “The Ants Go Marching”

  • Sing:  “Rain, Rain, Go Away”

  • Fingerplay: “The Days of Spring”

  • Fingerplay: “Caterpillar”

  • Sing: “You are My Sunshine”

Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.

Science/Social Studies/ Math

  • Shine flashlights in a darkened room/visually track the light

  • Feel water and mud on our feet

  • Explore nature items from outside (some under contact paper)

  • Use our sense of smell to smell real flowers

  • Explore nature sensory bags (water mixed with flowers)

Purpose:  Experience natural environmental living things; engage their 5 senses; experience with basic numeration.

Physical Development

  • Reach and/or grab onto hanging blue ribbon and scarves

  • Play hide the caterpillar

  • Squeeze/touch sponges with our hands in blue water

  • Spring sensory play

  • Search for vegetables in Dirt Dough (baking soda, food coloring and water)

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups.

 Arts Appreciation

  • Paint with brown paint mixed with dirt on green paper

  • Paint with green & pink paint on corkboard

  • Manipulate balls in a container with watercolors & wipes

  • Paint on top of flowers

  • “Ladybug” print art

  • Coffee Filter “Butterflies”

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their natural senses.

   Parent Participation

Spring has FINALLY approached us!  Take the opportunity to take advantage of the beautiful outdoors!  There are many great activities that you can do with your little one, such as taking a walk in your neighborhood and discussing what you and your child see, hear, smell, and touch.  Spring is such a beautiful season with all of the flowers blooming, birds chirping, and bugs crawling around.  There is so much to see in your own backyard, forest preserves, and nature parks.

Technology, Health and Safety are incorporated throughout the curriculum with daily interactions and planned activities.

                                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

106-108 Green Newsletter April 2016

106-108 April 2016 Infant Newsletter

Room News:

~ Our theme this month is “Springtime.”  The teachers have collaborated to come up with a variety of activities that will interest the children.

~ Please wish Mia “Happy 1st Birthday!”  Her birthday is on Thursday, April 21st!

~ Please wish George and his family all the best as he transitions into the Toddler I Program!  We will miss you very much!  Good Luck!

 Family Outings:

~ The Chicago Botanical Gardens – Miles of paths to see beautifully designed gardens brimming with plants; twenty-three garden areas showcasing the best plants for the Midwest; native habitat areas featuring native and endangered flora of Illinois. For more information: 1000 Lake Cook Rd.; Glencoe 60022; (847) 835-5440; http://www.chicagobotanic.org/

~ Independence GroveIndependence Grove offers outdoor recreation and education opportunities centered on a 115-acre lake. Surrounding prairie and woodlands provide a picturesque backdrop for hiking, biking, picnicking and other fun activities.  For more information: 16400 W Buckley Rd; Libertyville 60048; (847) 968-3499; http://www.lcfpd.org/IG/

 Timely Topic:  "The Importance of Spring Cleaning"

~ What do most people expect from spring cleaning? – Most people clean in the spring because it’s a tradition or habit they’ve developed because when their house has that clean feeling, it makes them feel better about themselves and their belongings. They get an opportunity to open up the windows and let some fresh air in, something they may not have been able to do since the late fall season (especially those who live in cold weather climates).

~ Who should really do spring cleaning? – Everyone, especially those who suffer from allergies, asthma and other breathing disorders. All winter long the house has been shut and one’s carpet becomes a breeding ground for airborne bacteria, mold spores, dust mite feces, pet dander, cat saliva, pollen, pollutants from ice melt chemicals, mud, dirt, sand and grit that we and our pets bring in from the outside. All of these things get lodged in our carpets, furnishings, bedding and draperies and they need to be cleaned. By reducing these allergens, dust particles and pollutants, we make our homes far healthier than if we didn’t clean it.

~ When and how often should you clean? – You should be as proactive as possible.  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies tells us that our carpets should be cleaned every 6 to 12 months, especially if you have young children and/or if anyone who exhibits a breathing condition.

(Source: http://smallbusinesstrendsetters.com/why-spring-cleaning-is-important-for-health/)

 School News:

~ April 11th-15th: “The Week of the Young Child” – More details to follow.

~ Friday, April 15th: Please join us for our Infant/Toddler Family Breakfast from 7:30am-9am to celebrate the Week of the Young Child. 

Did you know?

 ~ We value the partnerships that we have with our families and recognize the importance of meaningful two-way communication.

 ~ Our school has a beautiful inviting environment that respects our sense of order and provides a refreshing and cheerful place to spend our days.

 ~ The teachers use formal and informal assessments to help track your child’s progress.  These are shared through touch-base phone calls and at conferences.

 ~ At GBN, we pride ourselves on documenting children’s learning.  This is why we call our hallway boards “Documentation Boards” rather than bulletin boards.

106-108 Green Newsletter March 2016

106-108 March 2016 Newsletter

Room News:

~ Our theme for this month is “Dr. Seuss”.  The teachers have collaborated to come up with a variety of activities that will interest the children.

 Family Outings:

~ Cosley Zoo – Get up close to a large variety of domestic farm animals and native Illinois wildlife. You'll see cows, horses, sheep, goats, llamas, deer, birds, raccoons, rabbits, chickens, pigs, birds of prey, coyotes, burro and foxes. Offers paved pathways which are accessible for strollers and persons with disabilities. Cosley Zoo Information: 1356 Gary Ave.; Wheaton 60187; (630) 665-5534; http://cosleyzoo.org/

~ Skokie Public Library – Come enjoy our great spaces, collections, and services for babies through 8th graders.  Check out all the kid-friendly areas in our first floor: Youth Services area. Infants are able to hang out safely in their very own Baby Garden.  Children can listen to a story in our Program Room, make fun projects in our well-stocked Craft Room, or play with Lego’s or puppets in the Preschool Area.  Skokie Public Library Information: 5215 Oakton St.; Skokie 60077; 847-673-7774; https://skokielibrary.info/

 Timely Topic: Consistent Care at Home and Child Care Centers

~ Maintaining consistent routines and experiences for children across home and childcare is important for a variety of reasons.  Having elements of familiarity can relieve children’s anxiety about separating from their family.  Continuity helps children predict what is going to happen next and encourages them to feel as though they have a sense of control over what is occurring in their environment.  This empowers children and supports their developing independence.

~ While childcare centers should try to accommodate your child’s specific needs, it is important to understand that the individual attention that your child receives at home may not always be replicated in a group care environment.  Childcare professionals must implement practices that comply with licensing regulations, quality assurance standards and what is currently the recommended best practice(s) for children.  As such, childcare professionals may not be able to meet all requests from families for specific, individualized practices.

~ By working together with your child care professionals to combine the knowledge that you [as the parents] can offer about your child with the experience and formal training of your childcare professionals, a range of routines and strategies can be developed that will work both at home and in group care.  (Source: “Bridging the Gap Between Home and Child Care” by Georgia McKay)

 School News:

~ Thursday, March 17th from 4:30-5:45 pm: Come to our “Meet and Greet” with our school nurse, Karen Crawford. Please bring any questions/concerns you may have!

~ Friday, March 25th: GBN is closed for our Spring Break Day.  Enjoy your 3-day weekend with your family!  We will reopen on Monday, March 28th.

Did you know?

 ~ GBN has an open door policy – you are welcome to visit your child during the day.   We also have phones in every classroom for both parent and teacher convenience.

~ GBN uses the Ages and Stages (ASQ) questionnaire as a developmental screening tool for each child.

~ A parent area is located on our GBN website.  Visit www.gbnchildcare.com.  Click on Parent Area. The user name is Parent, and the password is Parent 123.

The Nielsen Center is play based and encourages children’s learning through exploration and discovery.

106-108 March 2016 Lesson Plan

106-108 March 2016 Lesson Plan

Dr. Seuss

 

 

Literacy/Language

  • Read: The Cat in the Hat
  • Read: The Shape of Me and Other Stuff
  • Read: Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You?
  • Read: Green Eggs and Ham
  • Read: Ten Apples up on Top
  • Read: If I Ran the Zoo
  • Read: Hop on Pop

Purpose:  Expose children to oral language and books.

Creative Expression

  • Sing: “Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!”

  • Sing: “Old Macdonald Had a Farm”
  • Sing:  “ABC’s”
  • Sing: “Wocket in my Pocket
  • Fingerplay: “1 Little, 2 Little, 3 Little Apples…”
  • Fingerplay: “Cat in the Hat”
  • Fingerplay: ““Goes with Fox on Sox”
Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.

Science/Social Studies/ Math

  • Make ooblek using cornstarch and water
  • Playing with the zoo animals
  • Counting 10 apples in Spanish using the overhead projector.
  • Look at our shadows with the overhead projector.
  • Trace our body outline on butcher paper
  • Touch red, yellow, green and blue frozen gloves for sensory
  • Explore paper-mache (flour, water, and newspaper strips)

Purpose: Experience natural environmental living things; engage their 5 senses; experience with basic numeration.

Physical Development

  • Reach and pop bubbles

  • Explore textured balls

  • Practice kicking and moving our feet

  • Roll our bodies from back to belly and belly to back

  • Move suction cupped toys on the floor or countertop

  • Explore how many blocks can balance before falling

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups.

Arts Appreciation

  • Painting with apples

  • Mixing blue and yellow to make green

  • Hand painting with red and white paint

  • Visual Art: look at red and blue fish projected on the wall

  • Paint with yellow paint using our feet

  • Roll textured balls through black paint onto white paper

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.

Parent Participation

Dr. Seuss had a clever and innate knowledge of how to make reading fun and engaging for young children.  His books all have some sort of learning value or lesson in them.  Take a trip to the library or check online to see the immense amount of books he authored during his career.  Encourage your child to explore their creative and imaginative sides just as Dr. Seuss did with his silly limericks and stories.

Technology, Health and Safety are incorporated throughout the curriculum with daily interactions and planned activities.

106-108 Green Lesson Plan February 2016

"Our Five Senses"

February 2016 Curriculum Plan

Literacy/Language

  • Read: "Touch and Feel:123 "

  • Read: "The Eye Book" by Dr. Seuss

  • Read: "I Can Read with My Eyes Shut!" by Dr. Seuss

  • Read: "The Nose Book" by Al Perkins

  • Read: "The Ear Book" by Al Perkins

  • Read: "A Taste of Honey" by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace

Purpose:  Expose children to oral language and books.

Creative Expression

  • Sing: “The Five Senses Song”

  • Sing: “My Five Senses”

  • Sing: “What Can I See…?”

  • Fingerplay: “This Little Piggy Went to the Market”

  • Fingerplay: “I Use My Five Senses”

  • Fingerplay: “Our Five Senses”

 Purpose: Provide exposure to rhyme for language development.

Physical Development

  • Roll or kick sensory balls or objects on the floor

  • Shake wristbands with bells

  • Splash water with our feet or hands

  • Watch and/or reach for floating bubbles

  • Practice grabbing or feeling loofas

  • Practice grabbing our toes on our backs

Purpose: Experience with following directions; engaging gross and fine motor muscle groups. 

Arts Appreciation

  • Paint with our feet

  • Paint over our reflection on the wall mirror

  • Use ink pads to make hand prints or footprints on paper

  • Paint using a paper towel roll

  • Listen to different musical instruments

Purpose: Expose children to different ways of artistic expression through their senses.

Science/Social Studies/ Math

  • Smell: Smell sensory jars with safe/various scents

  • Touch: Explore tactile posters on the floor

  • Sight and Touch: Explore colorful pasta

  • Hear and Sight: Practice counting with our fingers

  • Taste: Eat our food and/or our formula and/or breast milk

  • Hear: Listen to a story read by the teachers

Purpose: Experience natural environmental living things; engage their senses of touch; experience with basic numeration.

 Parent Participation

 

An infant uses its five senses both to get accustomed with their environment and to achieve comfort.  Every baby goes about this differently.  You and your child could explore the natural world using all five of their senses: i.e. tasting new foods/drinking from the bottle; listening to the sounds around them; watching what’s moving near and far; smelling different scents at home or school; and feeling various textures on their skin.  These will all help facilitate in the growth of your child’s development throughout their infancy.

**Technology, Health and Safety are incorporated throughout the curriculum with daily interactions and planned activities.**

106-108 Green Newsletter February 2016

106-108 February 2016 Newsletter

Room News:

~ Our theme for this month is “Our Five Senses”.  The teachers have collaborated to come up with a variety of activities that will interest the children.

~ Please welcome Elizabeth (Libby) Dallia and her parents, Catherine and Michael to Room 108.  We are excited you all have joined our classroom! We would also like to welcome Oliver Macias to room 106.  We are excited that you are here!

 Family Outings:

~ Kohl’s Children Museum – Offers more than a dozen interactive and hands-on exhibits and programs for young children.  Kohl’s Children Museum Information: 2100 Patriot Boulevard; Glenview 60026; (847) 832-6600; http://www.kohlchildrensmuseum.org/

~ Wheeling Indoor Arctic Pool – Offers a zero-depth leisure pool, a toddler slide, interactive water play structures, and a mini-lazy river all indoors!  Wheeling Indoor Arctic Pool Information: 333 W. Dundee Road; Wheeling 60090; 847/465-7674; www.wheelingparkdistrict.com/arctic-splash

 Timely Topic: Healthy Growth and Development

~ An Infant’s physical development unfolds quickly from birth. Newborns come into this world as fragile bundles in need of gentle handling, holding, head and neck support. Within three months time, infant’s necks and upper torsos strengthen to support their heads.

 ~ Infants continue to strengthen and develop throughout their first year from their heads to their feet as they go from prone to upright to standing; from uncontrolled large arm movements to deliberate reaching to picking up small bits of food with their finger tips.

 ~ The early learning environment plays a crucial role in development.  Infants early learning is optimized when they have time and safe spaces to explore their natural curiosities and when trusted caregivers are there to describe, interpret, and encourage these explorations (source: Gail Conway, M.Ed.).

 School News:

~ Come join us for the Infant-Wing Potluck and Sing-a-long will be on Wednesday, February 17th from 4:30-5:45 pm!  We will have a sing-a-long session in the mini-gym and a potluck feast in the classrooms.  A potluck food sign-up sheet will be posted on the clipboard in the next few weeks.  More information will follow.

Did you know?:

 ~ GBN has an open door policy – you are welcome to visit your child during the day.   We also have phones in every classroom for both parent and teacher convenience.

 ~ GBN is a peanut-free zone.

 ~ Karen Crawford is a registered nurse and has been Nielsen’s health nurse consultant since January 2004.  She graduated from Northern Illinois University.

 ~ The curriculum is literacy-rich, play-based, and project-oriented.