134Red Weather Curriculum Plan

CURRICULUM PLAN

February 2016

Emerging ideas for WEATHER

Literacy

  •  Read fiction and non-fiction books about weather,  such as
    • Little Cloud by Eric Carle
    • Wild Weather Days by Katie Marsico
  • Listen to books on CD following along with the book.
  • Dictate related stories and experiences.
  • Group Times

    ·         Examine weather-related words (i.e. sunny, rain, wind, clouds, hail, cold, hot, warm, freezing, etc.).

  • Investigate ways to check the weather (i.e. TV, IPad, radio, eyes, etc.).
  • Learn what instruments we use to check temperatures and how to use them.
  • Look at different clothing worn in different types of weather and temperature, and why we wear them.
  • Identify dangers associated with weather, such as storms and frostbite.
  • Learn how to spell some weather words (i.e. sun and wind).

Social Studies

  • Learn weather related words in different languages. For example, the Spanish word for sun is "sol".
  • Look at types of weather and temperatures around the world, especially in locations where we have relatives.

Math and Science

  • Experiment what happens when we wear cotton gloves vs. waterproof mittens.
  • Sort…clothing worn in different temperature, animals living in different climates, day and night activities, etc.
  • Pattern… weather pictures (i.e. sun, moon, sun, moon, etc.).
  • Make 1:1 correlation… (i.e. match raindrops to the numeral on various umbrellas).
  • Explore the concept of wind.
  • Experiment with different ways to create “rain.”

Art

  • Make suns using various mediums and techniques.
  • Create unique umbrellas.
  • Wind painting using straws to blow paint across paper.
  • Make clouds out of white playdough.
  • Paint with warm and cold colors as they relate to temperature.

Project Work

  • Track on a graph the temperature each day for an extended period of time and see trends.
  • Create a chart to show the weather each day and use it to track the weather.
  • Learn to identify the weather and temperature in order to determine whether or not we can go outside and play.